Rindie Eagle, MA, LPCC
Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Board Approved Supervisor LPCC/Master ART Practitioner/Certified HeartMath Biofeedback

From Around the Web







Amazing things are still happening in your brain even after an Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) session!  
Through ART, your brain rescripts traumatic images so that you leave with a ‘positized’ version of your traumatic memory. The term “positiziation” refers to what ART Developer, Laney Rosenzweig calls the process of transforming a negative memory into a more positive one. Through a process called ‘reconsolidation’, your brain changes how your memories are stored so that you can form new beliefs and perspectives. Researchers call this “rescripting.”
Your brain is creating new connections that didn’t exist before!
ART stimulates your brain’s innate capability to process and integrate traumatic memories. Some believe the changes that occur with ART may be likened to changes made during the Rapid Eye Movement sleep phase when your brain consolidates memories and works through emotions. This process makes traumatic memories less distressing and stores them in a more adaptive and integrated way in the brain.
Even after just one ART session, you’ll often experience a whole new lease on life.  You’ll feel more energetic, hopeful, and inspired. However, remember, even after the session, your brain is still working to “positize”, reconsolidate, and rescript for long-lasting results.  
Positive Things You Can Do for Yourself after an ART session

Indulge in Relaxation:

Before your ART session, you might have been living in a state of hyperarousal, as your amygdala has been overactive. 
Now that you’ve calmed this part of your brain, you’ll be able to rest deeply. The bilateral eye movements you performed during your session, a key component

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

  In her book “Come Passion, The Soulful ART of Healing Trauma,” Colleen Clark, RCSW, highlights the importance of delivering Psychoeducation to clients alongside ART sessions. Psychoeducation in trauma therapy involves explaining the client’s mental diagnosis and treatment choices to both the client and their family, helping them understand and cope with the illness by providing useful information and raising awareness.
When therapists and clients use trauma-informed Psychoeducation as part of their treatment plan, it can serve as a helpful map of where to go. In trauma therapy, Psychoeducation helps you recognize commonalities, makes you feel less alone, and reduces the shame you may feel around your trauma symptoms. You become more comfortable discussing your treatment with people in your life.
What are the benefits of Psychoeducation?
In the lens of trauma therapy, psychoeducation equips you with language, knowledge, and skills to discuss your experience with yourself and the people in your life. It also:

Helps you understand your journey: Knowledge is power. Understanding the “whats” and “whys” of trauma treatment increases your adherence to the process. You can see the roadmap and where you’re going.
Reduces shame: When there is an explanation behind your feelings and actions, you feel less judgment toward yourself. You understand that what happened to you is not your fault. What you’re experiencing is often a common and shared response to trauma among other survivors.
Increases hope: When you comprehend that trauma treatment will change your brain and make room for healing, you’re filled with a new-found sense of hope. Colleen states that

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

If you’ve ever felt butterflies in your stomach over an upcoming event, you’re well aware of the mind-body connection and how emotions can appear in different parts of the body. Our bodies can carry the weight of our memories, emotions, and trauma. The idea of stored emotions manifesting physically in our systems is not a new hypothesis; it’s a scientific observation with tangible effects. Modern scientific research frequently explores the link between mental and physical health and the mind-body connection. Meanwhile, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has studied the connection between emotions and the body for over two thousand years.
Understanding how stress hormones or states like hyperarousal and disassociation contribute to the physical imprints of emotional trauma is pivotal. The mind-body connection suggests that emotional states can dictate our health, physical comfort, and gene expressions.
To grasp trauma and stored emotions, we must look into how our bodies hold onto past experiences and ways to let them go. It is necessary to explore the somatic element of emotions, how the body holds on to the past, and modalities that can release it. As trauma affects parts of the brain that are preverbal, Accelerated Resolution Therapy explores bodily approaches to healing that are inaccessible through talk and other traditional therapies.

How do emotions get trapped?
We’ve all experienced overwhelming emotions that seemed to outweigh our capacity to handle them in the moment. As a result, these feelings can get stuck and never fully processed or expressed. It’s like the emotional system hitting pause on a

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

If you’ve ever felt butterflies in your stomach over an upcoming event, you’re well aware of the mind-body connection and how emotions can appear in different parts of the body. Our bodies can carry the weight of our memories, emotions, and trauma. The idea of stored emotions manifesting physically in our systems is not a new hypothesis; it’s a scientific observation with tangible effects. Modern scientific research frequently explores the link between mental and physical health and the mind-body connection. Meanwhile, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has studied the connection between emotions and the body for over two thousand years.
Understanding how stress hormones or states like hyperarousal and disassociation contribute to the physical imprints of emotional trauma is pivotal. The mind-body connection suggests that emotional states can dictate our health, physical comfort, and gene expressions.
To grasp trauma and stored emotions, we must look into how our bodies hold onto past experiences and ways to let them go. It is necessary to explore the somatic element of emotions, how the body holds on to the past, and modalities that can release it. As trauma affects parts of the brain that are preverbal, Accelerated Resolution Therapy explores bodily approaches to healing that are inaccessible through talk and other traditional therapies.

How do emotions get trapped?
We’ve all experienced overwhelming emotions that seemed to outweigh our capacity to handle them in the moment. As a result, these feelings can get stuck and never fully processed or expressed. It’s like the emotional system hitting pause on a

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

It can be hard to imagine that something that happened to our great-grandparents or even further back could still impact us today. Generational trauma, the notion that events from the past could stretch across generations and influence us today seems almost unbelievable.
Understanding and breaking the cycle of generational trauma is complex and must be fully understood before trauma treatment begins.  Trauma-informed Accelerated Resolution Therapists recognize the importance of understanding a client’s full background before they move forward with trauma healing.
It’s not just about dealing with our own experiences and memories; it’s also about grappling with our ancestors’ inherited pain and suffering. 

“Trauma is commonly intergenerational, so many of our clients are carrying not only what they have experienced in their own lifespans, but also the legacy of the crushing weight of emotional, relational, and psychological pain that has outstripped former generations’ ability to cope effectively.” – Christie Eastman, MA, LPC, NCC , Master ART Therapist and Trainer

How does trauma become inter-generational?
Trauma can have a “trickle-down” effect. It’s not just an individual experience; it can also spill over and affect the next generation. Studies have shown that trauma can be passed down through genetics, affecting the way our bodies and brains respond to stress. But it’s not just about biology – it’s also about how trauma shapes the environment in which the next generation grows up.
A parent who has experienced any type of trauma may have difficulties in providing a calm demeanor for their children. They could experience trouble with emotional regulation,

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

Often, the symptoms of trauma and ADHD are so similar they can be mistaken for each other. Their comparable symptoms often make it difficult to diagnose the source. .  With so much overlap, it begs the question: Does trauma contribute to ADHD? 
ADHD diagnoses have been on the rise throughout the past few years. Millions of children and adults are being diagnosed with ADHD, and the numbers continue to rise. What has contributed to the growing numbers? A possible contribution could be that we are becoming more aware of the nuances of the condition and are becoming better at recognizing and treating it accurately. 
As we understand more about the neurodevelopmental condition, we can see that genetic, neurobiological, and environmental factors are at play. However, some studies indicate that children with ADHD are more likely to have trauma histories, experiencing a traumatic event, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or Complex trauma. While everyone’s exposure and experience are different, research suggests that childhood trauma could affect the development of ADHD and vice versa. 
Why is it often difficult to differentiate between trauma and ADHD?
The common symptoms of ADHD and trauma can often appear in very similar ways. Shared symptoms of both trauma and ADHD include:

Inattention: People with both ADHD and trauma struggle from a lack of focus on tasks or activities, becoming distracted by unrelated and unwanted thoughts or stimuli. They may also struggle to follow through on instructions or organize tasks.
Impulsivity: Impulsive behavior is a hallmark of ADHD and can be frequent in trauma.

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

The impact of Accelerated Resolution Therapy can be life-saving. Beyond providing relief for various life-altering mental health challenges, including anxiety, depression, OCD, grief, and PTSD, ART has demonstrated incredible efficacy in emergency situations, such as suicidal intent. It frequently serves as a final recourse for clients who have exhausted numerous other techniques in their pursuit of relief. Such was the case for Ann Haydu’s client, “Abby.”
Ann Haydu’s ARTistry: Thirty Years of Healing and Innovation
With over thirty years of experience, Ann Haydu, LCSW, has dedicated her career to working with individuals in various life stages, including children, adolescents, adults, and older people and couples. Specializing in trauma healing, she is a Master Level ART therapist. In the past, she has consulted with the creator of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), Laney Rosenzweig LMFT, traveling throughout the U.S. to provide training to both military and civilian therapists in the application of ART.

Abby’s Story: Navigating Complexity with ART
Ann encountered a particularly unique case while working with “Abby”, a thirty-seven-year-old female client diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. Over the course of more than ten years working together, Ann developed a deep understanding of Abby’s complex situation. Abby also faced a combination of intricate physical and mental disabilities, including a chromosomal abnormality. During her early years, she underwent five eye surgeries before the age of five. She spent a lot of time in the hospital during her formative years, and there were moments when her parents were concerned about her survival.
Apart from this, Abby’s mental health deteriorated

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

The impact of Accelerated Resolution Therapy can be life-saving. Beyond providing relief for various life-altering mental health challenges, including anxiety, depression, OCD, grief, and PTSD, ART has demonstrated incredible efficacy in emergency situations, such as suicidal intent. It frequently serves as a final recourse for clients who have exhausted numerous other techniques in their pursuit of relief. Such was the case for Ann Haydu’s client, “Abby.”
Ann Haydu’s ARTistry: Thirty Years of Healing and Innovation
With over thirty years of experience, Ann Haydu, LCSW, has dedicated her career to working with individuals in various life stages, including children, adolescents, adults, and older people and couples. Specializing in trauma healing, she is a Master Level ART therapist. In the past, she has consulted with the creator of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), Laney Rosenzweig LMFT, traveling throughout the U.S. to provide training to both military and civilian therapists in the application of ART.

Abby’s Story: Navigating Complexity with ART
Ann encountered a particularly unique case while working with “Abby”, a thirty-seven-year-old female client diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. Over the course of more than ten years working together, Ann developed a deep understanding of Abby’s complex situation. Abby also faced a combination of intricate physical and mental disabilities, including a chromosomal abnormality. During her early years, she underwent five eye surgeries before the age of five. She spent a lot of time in the hospital during her formative years, and there were moments when her parents were concerned about her survival.
Apart from this, Abby’s mental health deteriorated

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

As we approach the holidays, you may feel several emotions: warm and happy, excited, or maybe you feel anxious and even a little bit blue. The holidays involve seeing friends and family we may not have seen all year, and for some, this can be anxiety-producing and outright triggering. If this is true for you, practicing clear boundary setting is vital before any potentially distressing event. 
  Many people need help setting boundaries, as it is a skill that is sometimes not appropriately modeled. Even if clear boundaries have not been established in the past, rest assured that it’s never too late to learn how.
Putting boundaries into place can give you back control over a situation where others seem to have all the power and the say over your comfort. Communicating what is “okay” and not “okay” is essential to protect your physical and mental energy and ensure your safety.  
Why set boundaries
Setting boundaries is like putting up signposts around your emotional and mental space. Boundaries help to recognize and respect that you have your own thoughts, memories, and experiences that shouldn’t get mixed up with someone else’s. 
  What’s more, boundaries can work like your own internal alarm. They let you know when someone’s getting too close to your emotional or mental limits. Your emotions can serve as guidance systems to let you know when boundaries are needed. If a conversation leaves you feeling drained or anxious, it could indicate a breach of your boundaries.
 Boundaries, in a way, act like security guards for your stress

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

Trauma affects everyone differently. As there is no universal or “correct” response to a situation, two people going through the same event can report wildly different experiences. So, in choosing the best trauma therapy, it’s important to examine your unique needs. There are many different options to choose from to help you discover the right approach for your healing journey.
What is trauma?
Trauma is a deeply distressing or disturbing event that has overwhelmed your nervous system beyond its capacity to cope. In times of trauma, your body undergoes a heightened state of alertness, preparing for either a fight-or-flight response, while your brain actively searches for indicators of potential threats. These events take various forms and occur in different settings. Trauma could stem from instances of natural disasters, combat in war zones, physical or sexual abuse, neglect, domestic violence, accidents, and witnessing or experiencing violence. Trauma’s effects can be immediate and long-lasting, affecting your physical health, mental well-being, and emotional stability.
As trauma activates your survival mind, it activates your autonomic nervous system. You may experience physical symptoms like a racing heart, sweating, trembling, difficulty breathing, and fatigue. Mentally, you might feel overwhelmed, confused, or disoriented. Emotionally, you can grapple with intense fear, anxiety, sadness, anger, or a sense of detachment.  
Long after the traumatic experience is over, your brain and body are still in states of high alert, searching for potential danger.  This long-term existence in survival mode can impact your overall health and well-being. Trauma has the capacity to modify your brain

Link to Original Post - ART Blog

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