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The stigma around seeing a therapist is not nearly what it once was.  In fact, many understand that going to therapy doesn’t mean there is “something wrong with you” but rather there are things you may not be able to see or understand in yourself that a therapist can help illuminate, then guide you to remove the obstacles that have held you back individually and/or in your relationships.
When I first started my private practice many years ago, it was more common to see shame and embarrassment come up for people when they began therapy.  They were less likely to talk about it with others as they feared the perception of that would be negative.  Over the recent years, however, this has changed.  Many freely talk about their therapists and that they are in individual and couples counseling.  Needing a little support doesn’t have the same negative connotation it used to which I believe was a repellent to seeking help.    The education around mental health has helped push that along immensely.  “It’s ok not be okay,” has been instrumental in that.  The challenges that we have faced societally in the last few years has also exacerbated the need for intervention

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com