Rindie Eagle, MA, LPCC
Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
From around the web

I’ve been feeling a little sideways lately; bewildered, frustrated and a wee bit crazy.  What appears clear as my hand in front of me is reportedly something different to a group of people, unfortunately who have the power to do something about it.  And my lament is accepting the possibility what what seems so wrong will actually go unchanged.  The reality is, these things are part of life but for the moment, I am reminding myself of how to more easily swallow this pill if need be.
Truth is, there are many circumstances that can feel confusing to the degree that you feel sideways.  Unhealthy relationships, dysfunctional families, a toxic workplace are a few examples.  In many cases, you can actually DO something about it and get out of the situation (though this can be really hard for some, especially with trauma histories and self esteem issues).  And there are other cases where you do not have the ability as an individual to change the situation but to simply observe as things unfold.  You are powerless.
We all can have moments where we can sometimes feel “sideways” about a situation.  When it becomes more problematic is when it shifts from periodic to

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

The TOEFL exam isn’t a straightforward check. The TOEFL writing part got two tasks. All the TOEFL essay matters are created using the very same purpose in your brain. Notice Essay Writing for Standardized Assessments to learn more about how you can create such an essay. The initial stage to creating a great essay is […]
The post homeowner or permanent person for a co-signer might be ready to secure money that is instructional through their house nation or additional global lender. appeared first on tonyrobbins.com.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Linda Graham, MFT and author of Resilience and Bouncing Back, looks at the two pillars of healthy social connections and provides exercises in how to cultivate them.  
I regularly experience the power of wisely connecting with my fellow human beings in a special way: to drive from home to work I have to pass through a 4-way stop sign intersection.  All drivers have to figure out who’s going through the intersection next. No verbal communication, sometimes a friendly wave through.  We all figure it out quietly, respectfully.  A sense of connection in a 10-second community of fellow travelers that brings a smile to my heart.
Many, many research studies these days document the importance of healthy social connections for  enjoyment and fulfillment in living, especially as we get older. (See the excellent if densely scientific Promoting Healthy, Meaningful Aging through Social Involvement from the National Institute of Health.)
Let’s look at the two pillars of healthy social connections – common humanity (we’re all the same) and theory of mind (we’re each different), part of this month’s focus on skills of relational intelligence that support healthy, resonant relationships.  My shared humanity at the all-stop intersection, along with we are each making our own decisions in that moment, is a small example of that much

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

A couple close to me recently celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary. On the surface, they are like ‘chalk and cheese.’ The wife is optimistic, impulsive and very positive. The husband, on the other hand, is a wee bit less optimistic and less impulsive. About ten years into their marriage I asked her what it was…
The post Marry Someone With the Same Vision and Who Makes You Laugh appeared first on Start Marriage Right.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

She’s pushed your buttons by doing the very thing she said she would never do. You are incensed! These actions feel like a violation of trust. Out of aggravation, your response is unkind and loud. For both of you, you’re each seeing a side that you’ve never seen before: yelling, screaming, tears, and restraint as…
The post Commitment Conversations appeared first on Start Marriage Right.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Did I offer peace today? Did I bring a smile to someone’s face? Did I say words of healing? Did I let go of my anger and resentment? Did I forgive? Did I love? These are the real questions. I must trust that the little bit of love that I sow now will bear many…
The post Love is Learned appeared first on Start Marriage Right.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Richard Nicastro, PhD explores the impact of having an avoidant attachment style in relationships and why a deep emotional connection can feel so scary to some.  
For those who have an avoidant attachment style, caring comes at a significant emotional cost.
“It’s always been hard for me to get close to people. I have this wall that goes up. Maybe it’s never completely down. I know it’s frustrated my wife. I’ve been accused of not feeling, of being distant, of not caring, of being afraid of intimacy…it’s just that…well, there’s this wall, it’s always been a part of me.” —Kiefer, age 39
Once you care deeply about someone, there is always the threat of loss. Loss and caring go hand-in-hand. When others become important to us, they have considerable power —  power to uplift, power to sway, power to hurt. The emotionally avoidant anticipate that this power will lead to pain. A pain that may arise from clashing agendas, incompatibilities of desire and interest, pain for caring more than the other, a pain that may be reminiscent of earlier relational wounds.

For too many, the road to emotional intimacy is paved with potential danger.
For those of us who have learned to prioritize avoidance strategies,

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

In Northern California, we have had three years in a row of major fires during October not only causing massive destruction but impacting large areas surrounding the actual fires by unhealthy air quality as smoke blanketed communities.  This current fire season was recently met by the electric company (PG&E) with pre-emptive shut offs during hot, dry and very windy conditions to try to minimize further impact.  This meant many communities in the Bay Area had no power for day after day while they nervously watched a massive fire raging under the most dangerous of weather conditions.
It’s interesting to notice the collective angst that is generated during this type of event.  If you tend toward anxiety, a situation like this can be particularly activating.  I was out of the country as the fire grew with my husband and son home in Mill Valley.  Though I was away on a mini vacation, I had one eye on California and the unfolding situation the entire time.  I was nervous and didn’t like being away from my family when things appeared to be unraveling in such a way.
When I landed in Oakland this past Sunday night, we glided down through a haze of golden

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Toby Mac said, “God is still writing your story. Quit trying to steal the pen.” God is the Author of beauty from ashes and triumph from tragedy. He has given us a voice to share our struggles so that others might not face those same difficulties and hardships. Perhaps we can share our past struggles…
The post Three Things I Learned The Hard Way In Marriage appeared first on Start Marriage Right.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

The following article is written by Peter Diamandis (see full bio below) and first appeared on his blog. Join Peter and Tony on October 30th at 12pm PT as they discuss the power of Massively Transformative Purposes and why “moonshot” thinking is the only way to be as an entrepreneur. Register here for the webinar. […]
The post Asking “who,” not “how” appeared first on tonyrobbins.com.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com