Rindie Eagle, MA, LPCC
Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
From around the web

Science says even a little bit of mindfulness can pack a positive punch.  Mindfulness.  And you don’t need a long meditation practice to experience a decrease in physical pain and negativity.  
Merely a brief introduction to mindfulness helps people deal with physical pain and negative emotions, a new study by researchers at Yale, Columbia, and Dartmouth shows.

The effect of mindfulness was so pronounced, they found, that even when participants were subjected to high heat on their forearm, their brain responded as if it was experiencing normal temperature.
“It’s as if the brain was responding to warm temperature, not very high heat,” said Yale’s Hedy Kober, associate professor of psychiatry and psychology and corresponding author of the paper, which appeared in the journal Social, Cognitive, and Affective Neuroscience.
Mindfulness — the awareness and acceptance of a situation without judgment — has been shown to have benefits in treating many conditions such as anxiety and depression. But Kober and colleagues wanted to know whether people with no formal training in meditation and mindfulness might benefit from a brief 20-minute introduction into mindfulness concepts.
Participants in the study were tested in two contexts while undergoing brain imaging scans — one for assessing response to physical pain induced

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

I am a pastor. And, much of what I address regarding marriage and family is heavily influenced by what I experience as a pastor. But, I do not mean what I experience with other families. Much of what I write about is what I experience with my own marriage and family. To be more specific,…
The post Taking A Break appeared first on Start Marriage Right.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Richard Nicastro, Phd, digs into the painful experience of being betrayed in an intimate relationship, offering insights into how to move into a space of self-care and compassion.  
An emotional tsunami often follows the discovery that your spouse/partner is (or was) having an affair. A psychological trauma has occurred in the form of a betrayal that can result in a wide range of psychological, emotional and physical symptoms.
The emotional distress and intensity of feelings make self-care a top priority in the affair recovery process. At the same time, it’s easy for self-care to fall by the wayside when your pain is extreme. Consider this article a gentle reminder to bring self-compassion to your journey.
The pain of discovery
Prior to finding out about the affair, you may have had suspicions that something wasn’t right —  your spouse/partner may have been acting in uncharacteristic ways that raised a red flag. You might have asked him/her, “Is everything OK?” or openly wondered about a specific behavior (“Why are you suddenly taking your cell phone everywhere you go?”).
In these instances, the repeated denials by your partner can be disorienting. Your instincts are telling you that you should be concerned, while your partner might be very convincing that

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

As a couples therapist, I am all too familiar with the Valentine’s Day illusion. For one night, you remember the three keys to passion. For one night, you romance the beautiful creature you are lucky enough to be spending your life with. And then, after the roadside rose stands pack up and go home, you […]
The post Plan for Passion appeared first on tonyrobbins.com.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

It’s so easy to fall in love. Remember the excitement, the romance, and the lust? Sure, there were some challenges, but you were so happy as you explored whether you wanted to let this fascinating person into your bed, your heart, and your bank account. You planned dates, you dressed to impress, and you opened […]
The post The 3 keys to passion appeared first on tonyrobbins.com.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Whether you plan to shower love on a sweetie, your friends, enjoy your children’s experience with Valentines Day or none of the above, how about adding a loving focus on YOU?
Self-care is self-love.  
Self-care is just that, mindful attention to things that feel good for you, that give you a sense of peace and ground you when things get crazy.  And you are the only one who can make it happen.  Nobody else if responsible for your self-care.
For some, it can be challenging to make this happen.  Obstacles include prioritizing the time to do it but also beliefs about whether you deserve it.  Truthfully, you can be your best person; your best friend, partner, spouse, girlfriend, co-worker and parent if you allow space for the little things that bring you joy, allow for rest or do whatever it is that relaxes you and makes you happy.
The self-love I’m speaking about is not the narcissistic kind but a state of appreciation of yourself and your need to be as well psychologically.  Women are tasked with a lot these days; taking care of many and often working.  Consider it less of an indulgence and more of a practiced discipline for improved emotional and

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

If you’re in a relationship, or have ever been in one, you know that communication is key to its success. Numerous studies have identified communication (or lack thereof) as one of the top reasons for couples therapy, as well as one of the primary reasons for break-up and divorce. In fact, most couples that come […]
The post Does fear derail your communication? appeared first on tonyrobbins.com.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

One of the patterns in work – and life – is the rhythm of thinking and doing, contemplation and action. Teams and companies that adaptively shift between these two operating modes accelerate learning with the result of being more resilient, agile and enduring. For leaders, this means lowering the barriers that tend to keep teams […]
The post Commit to actions, not beliefs appeared first on tonyrobbins.com.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Whoever said “Love means never having to say you’re sorry” must have been married to a stuffed unicorn. Or a plastic potted plant. Because if they were in a relationship with a human, that statement likely turned into “Love means I’m on a dirt road to divorce court because I never say I’m sorry.” Let’s […]
The post The art of the mindful apology appeared first on tonyrobbins.com.

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com

Rick Hanson, PhD is an author and teacher about the inner skills of personal well being, psychological growth and relationships.  He explores the important of lightenening your load and avoiding picking up unnecessary new burdens.
On the path of life, most of us are hauling way too much weight.
What’s in your own backpack? If you’re like most of us, you’ve got too many items on each day’s To Do list and too much stuff in the closet. Too many entanglements with other people. And too many “shoulds,” worries, guilts, and regrets.
Remember a time when you lightened your load. Maybe a backpacking trip when every needless pound stayed home. Or after you finally left a bad relationship. Or just stopped worrying about something. Or came clean with a friend about something that had been bothering you. How did this feel? Probably pretty great.
Sure, we are no longer nomadic hunter-gatherers whose possessions could be carried in one hand. You know what you really need in this life; personally, I’m glad about good friends and a full refrigerator. But all the extra physical and mental stuff you lug around complicates your life, weighs you down, and keeps you stuck. There’s enough weightiness in life

Originally published at http://loveandlifetoolbox.com